Wisdom

Definition from Psychology Today.

“It can be difficult to define Wisdom, but people generally recognize it when they encounter it. Psychologists pretty much agree it involves an integration of knowledge, experience, and deep understanding that incorporates tolerance for the uncertainties of life as well as its ups and downs. There’s an awareness of how things play out over time, and it confers a sense of balance.

Wise people generally share an optimism that life’s problems can be solved and experience a certain amount of calm in facing difficult decisions. Intelligence—if only anyone could figure out exactly what it is—may be necessary for wisdom, but it definitely isn’t sufficient; an ability to see the big picture, a sense of proportion, and considerable introspection also contribute to its development.”

WIn my lifetime I’ve been called a wise-guy, wise-ass, and a wise-you-name-it. I don’t recall denying any of it. But until I lost a significant amount of hair, gained a lot of scars (and weight), and dealt with a good bit of life’s experiences, no one has used the words wise or wisdom (without suffix) regarding me. So, as I was running through the w’s (women, walking, wine, wild, Wilde, and why) in search of an ‘a-to-z challenge’ blog topic, my wife says, “How about wisdom? You should know about that.” (Her birthday is tomorrow.)

wisdom3To me, the word wisdom has much in common with the word quality. Both are generally positive; we recognize them (or their absence) when we see or encounter either. But, precise definition for both eludes us. We are willing to take on as much quality and wisdom as possible, but with one condition. We want to know the cost. What price must we pay for quality? Can we afford it? What price must we pay for wisdom? Are we willing to pay the price?

wisdom8As a college student, I would walk into the Seven-Eleven store and eyeball the beer coolers. I looked only at price per six-pack. Texas Pride was 86-cents for six cans. I still can’t believe I managed to drink that horse piss, but price mattered more on my tight budget. I ignored quality. Little did I know then that years later I would gladly pay eight-to-twelve times as much for top-quality, locally brewed, craft beer. My taste and budget have both matured in quality.

wisdom7I had a conversation with a friend who was a wonderful, doting, and loving mother to her children. As I listened to her rant-on one day concerning some problem that her son was having, I asked her this question. “You love your son. Why do insist on preventing him from learning life’s lessons simply because they are painful? Be there for him. Protect him from serious harm. But allow him the dignity of learning his own lessons.” Before she got over her hurt feelings about what I had said, she backed off (he owes me). Hard for her, good for him.

Our wisdom sponge is dry at birth. It may be the only thing that is. As we age, that sponge soaks up more wisdom with each life lesson. It seems to me that the more painful the lesson, the better we learn it. I’m not sure that I accept the proposition that there is much intelligence in wisdom. We only need to be smart enough to learn from our best life-long teacher – experience. But I do think that the quality of our intelligence improves as we gain wisdom.

Wisdom4We are wiser when older because we have been schooled in life longer.

 

 

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15 thoughts on “Wisdom

  1. Pingback: Wisdom — Our Rainy Journey – reidresearchlibrary

  2. Your words “sound” wisdom… I agree with you in everything if we can get some wisdom… it’s because we have some years on our backs… I’m near 80!!!!!! Awful!!!!!

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  3. Such a beautiful post! Intelligence is hard to measure. Some people are “book smart” and other people seem to have more intuition about things happening around them, and are better at making decisions. Some people have both.

    Wisdom is more elusive than knowledge, or any sort of intelligence. Though, I’m not entirely sure if it comes with age. Some children are more wise than some adults I know.

    This was very thoughtful!

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  4. I was just thinking the same thing as Jennifer – the getting of wisdom isn’t automatic with age and some children are born wise it seems – their natural intelligence hasn’t yet been cluttered up by the misconceptions and prejudices of adults. Its a lovely piece. We are on the downhill run now… barely a bump till we cross the finish line (mind you X Y and Z are no pushovers…. the speed bumps to spoil the race to the finish line)

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    • Thank you, Philipa. I have to clean up Y and have Z yet to write, but I should make it ok. This has been quite an experience. While I will miss it, I’m glad it’s almost over too.

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