Haiku

Haiku is both a form and genre of poetry. Poems are short. Haiku is of Japanese origin and consists of three lines, usually with 12 syllables.  The first and third lines normally have five syllables each, and the second seven. Exceptions abound.

According to some, haiku captures a moment when nature is linked with human nature. As a newbie, I stuck to the traditional form, but the history of haiku includes many variations. Many haiku are penned every day and in many languages, throughout the world. These are my first three.

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Curves

The wet path it curves
See as plants touch with plants
With different sounds

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Growth

In the cold spring rain
Clinging to the earth below
Yellow flowers grow

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Click this photo to go a page to hear the sound, whip-poor-will is an onomatopoeia.

Comfort

Still warm and dark night
Stars quietly fill the sky
A whip-poor-will sounds

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Always look both ways
Every day write some haiku
And mind all the gaps

 

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8 thoughts on “Haiku

  1. Your poetry takes me to places I have never been. Good job putting the link to the whip-poor-will. Don’t think I have ever really heard one before.

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